Training Furniture & Classroom Design FAQ

  1. Is furniture for schools Contract?
  2. Why is classroom design an issue?
  3. What are the major concerns?
  4. Does furniture affect learning?
  5. Can furniture in a classroom affect my child?


FAQ Finder

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1. Is furniture for schools Contract?
Yes, it is Contract. Sometimes it's special, but, these days, more and more higher education institutions are looking at commercial furniture because the student population is older. Check out Education - The Electronic Classroom.
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2. Why is classroom design an issue?
There is considerable concern about the integration of computers into the classroom. The main problem seems to be the conflict between what we'll call "classroom reality" and "classroom virtual reality." In other words, What is the job of the teacher and how does the learning environment affect learning? The topic is way to large to discuss here, but you will find a wealth of information in Education - The Electronic Classroom.
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3. What are the major concerns?
Two major issues which we cover in depth are classroom layout and video conferencing environments.

In addition, providing an ergonomic work space for students has taken on increased importance with the wealth of empirical data now available. Designing ergonomically correct furniture is difficult because so many different users need to be accomodated. See our Ergonomic Issues section.
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4. Does furniture affect learning?
Studies show that comfort affects our ability to absorb and retain information and distractions that are the result of the classroom environment certainly contribute to wasted classroom time. However, removal of physical distractions are only part of the issue. It is necessary to understand and accommodate human physiology at all levels of education in order to achieve maximum potential.

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5. Can furniture in a classroom affect my child?
Absolutely. Not a lot has been seriously documented about RSI's in children from school computing activities, but a lot has been learned from video games and the results don't bode well for the Information Generation. Care should be taken by school administrators and parents to be aware of the dangers, as well as the benefits, of computers in the classroom and to take the appropriate steps to provide comfortable computing environments designed for the young.

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